Husch Blackwell successfully defends Missouri man wrongfully charged with multiple crimes

A 19-year-old Missouri man charged with 12 counts of assault, armed criminal action and unlawful use of a weapon is now walking free thanks to the law firm Husch Blackwell.

Husch Blackwell, with offices in Clayton, successfully represented a man who was mistakenly identified by a chief witness in a case. After a three-day trial in St. Louis, the jury returned a verdict of not guilty on all counts after just an hour of deliberation.

If convicted, Husch Blackwell’s client faced a minimum of 15 years in prison and up to life imprisonment. The law firm did not wish to release their client’s identity.

The victory was the firm’s first verdict in a jury trial while representing clients as a member of the Missouri Coalition for the Right to Counsel (MCRC), a nonprofit group launched in 2017 to ease the strains on Missouri’s overburdened public defender system by tasking lawyers in private practice with providing pro bono legal services to defendants.

“This was a case of mistaken identity with a chief witness of dubious credibility,” Kyle Seelbach, Husch Blackwell’s lead partner on the trial team, said in a statement. “But developing this defense required creativity, resources, and attention to detail, and this is precisely where the Coalition is making a difference. I’m proud of my firm for participating, particularly when the stakes are so high for the people we represent.”

The Husch Blackwell team was led by Seelbach and included Jonathan Schmalfeld, Shannon Peters, and Lisa Carter.

Prior to this jury trial victory, Husch Blackwell also secured a pair of dismissals on behalf of two clients referred to the firm by MCRC.

With offices in 18 cities across the United States, Husch Blackwell is an industry-focused litigation and business law firm. The firm represent clients around the world in major industries, including energy and natural resources; financial services and capital markets; food and agribusiness; healthcare, life sciences and education; real estate, development and construction; and technology, manufacturing and transportation.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.